By now we’re all familiar with the shopping holidays that follow Thanksgiving —  Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber Monday. They’re all great opportunities to find deals on gifts and help small businesses. But our favorite post Thanksgiving holiday really hits on the meaning of the season — Giving Tuesday.

Giving Tuesday is all about inspiring people to do good in the world. You’ll likely see nonprofit organizations reaching out to their donors and using #GivingTuesday on social media this December 1st to raise awareness. It’s a time for us all to think about ways to give back, pay it forward, and help our communities.

Do you want to get your children in on the act of Giving Tuesday this year? We’ve rounded up 10 ways you and your family can celebrate Giving Tuesday virtually or from a safe social distance.

Here are some suggestions:

1. Make a family donation

Have a family meeting and discuss what it means to donate to charity and what causes are important to you. Once you’ve brainstormed ideas, look up nonprofit organizations and choose one together to support with your monetary donation.

2. Create giving jars

Once you’ve talked about donations, ask your children if they would like to donate any of their own money to help people in their community. If they are into the idea, set up three different jars in their room — one for saving, one for spending, and one for giving. When they earn money through chores, get an allowance, or receive money as a present, your children can choose how much money to put in each jar. Then next Giving Tuesday, or whenever they are ready, your child can make a donation of their own.

3. Draw a picture for a loved one

Giving doesn’t have to be all about money. It can also be about spreading love to  friends and family members you can’t see this holiday season. Have your children draw pictures to pop in the mail as a fun surprise. Who doesn’t love getting non-bill related mail?

4. Buy items for a military care package

As you’re doing your weekly shopping or browsing online sales, stock up on items that can be donated to troops overseas. Have your children help you pack up the items to send to organizations that will get everything over to our military in care packages.

5. Donate clothing and toys

Ask your children to go through their toys and clothes to find things they can donate to families in need. Teach children young that they can give back in lots of different ways, and sneakily get them to clean their rooms in the process.

6. Post on social media

If there is a cause you and your family care about, share about it on social media using the #GivingTuesday hashtag to inspire more donations. You can also get your kids in on the act without having to share their photo on social media — ask them to draw a picture or make a sign and then share that image online.

7. Random acts of kindness

Pay for a stranger’s coffee in the drive through, buy a grocery store gift card to hand off to the person six feet away from you in line, put away shopping carts in the parking lot (and then make sure to use hand sanitizer.) Encourage your children to find one extra kind thing they can do for others too on Giving Tuesday too and inspire a lifetime of giving.

8. Participate in a virtual toy drive

Toy drives are going to look a little different this year, but you can still participate virtually. Ask your children to help you pick items off of a virtual wish list created by organizations running drives for families in need this holiday season.

9. Driveway thank you note

Break out the sidewalk chalk and share a note of thanks on your driveway or sidewalk for delivery workers and neighbors. That little note and adorable stick figure drawing might just make someone smile today, and that’s a great way to give back.

10. Donate to a food bank

Times are tough this year especially, give back where you can on Giving Tuesday and beyond by donating to a local food bank. Donate through contactless drop off or through monetary donations.

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